?

Log in

hello_bookies
23 March 2007 @ 02:58 pm
The eponymous Blessings is a stately house now gone to seed, inhabited by Mrs. Blessing, an 80-year-old wealthy semirecluse with an acerbic tongue and a reputation for hanging on to every nickel. Widowed during WWII, Lydia Blessing was banished to her socially prominent family's country estate for reasons that are revealed only gradually. Austere, unbending and joyless, Lydia has no idea, when she hires young Skip Cuddy as her handyman, how her life and his are about to change. Skip had promise once, but bad companions and an absence of parental guidance have led to a stint in the county jail. When Skip stumbles upon a newborn baby girl who's been abandoned at Blessings, he suddenly has a purpose in life. With tender devotion, he cares secretly for the baby for four months, in the process forming a bond with Mrs. Blessing, who discovers and admires his clandestine parenting skills. A double betrayal destroys their idyll. As usual, Quindlen's fine-tuned ear for the class distinctions of speech results in convincing dialogue. Evoking a bygone patrician world, she endows Blessings with an almost magical aura. While it skirts sentimentality by a hairbreadth, the narrative is old-fashioned in a positive way, telling a dramatic story through characters who develop and change, and testifying to the triumph of human decency when love is permitted to grow and flourish.

At the time when I read this, I thought it was fabulous. Now I realize that all of Anna Quindlen's work is fabulous. I think she's my new favourite author!
 
 
hello_bookies
27 September 2006 @ 03:09 pm
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Paul and Amy McMurray are a young Portland couple whose troubled marriage is finally on the mend--thanks to the birth of their precious new son, Eddie. Carl Jorgenson is a divorced man who is childless and alone. His one dream is to have a son and give him the life--and love--he never had. And in one split second, Carl kidnaps Eddie and changes everyone's lives forever. (review taken from amazon.ca)

Very easy read. Sort of reminded me of a Danielle Steel novel written by a male. However it managed to keep me interested until the end.
 
 
hello_bookies
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


It’s a classic single-woman scenario: you really like this guy, but he’s giving mixed messages. You make excuses, decide he’s confused, afraid of commitment. Behrendt, a former executive story editor for Sex and the City—and a formerly single (now happily married) guy who knows all the excuses—provides a simple answer: he’s just not that into you. Stop kidding yourself, let go and look for someone else who will be. After all, as Behrendt sensibly puts it, "if a (sane) guy really likes you, there ain’t nothing that’s going to get in his way." If you’re not convinced yet, by all means read this smart, funny and surprisingly upbeat little book, full of q’s and a’s covering every excuse woman has ever made to avoid admitting to herself that a man just wasn’t that smitten with her. (Review from Publishers Weekly)

Good book. And very to the point! I'm happy with my relationship so most of this didn't pertain to me. Even so, there were a few things in there that made me think.
 
 
hello_bookies
26 September 2006 @ 05:29 pm
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


No one but Mitch Albom could have read Tuesdays with Morrie so effectively. As the author of this inspirational true story, Albom uses verbal inflection in exactly the right places to evoke humor, empathy, and emotion. It's an honest reading, and the underlying timbre of private memory pushes it past mere recitation to pure storytelling.

The titular Morrie was Morrie Schwartz, Albom's university professor 20 years before the events being narrated. An accidental viewing of an interview with Morrie on Nightline led Albom to become reunited with his old teacher, friend, and "coach" at a time when Albom, a successful sportswriter, was struggling to define dissatisfactions with his own life and career. Morrie, on the other hand, after a rich life filled with friends, family, teaching, and music, was dying from Lou Gehrig's disease, a crippling illness that diminished his activities daily. Albom was one of hundreds of former students and acquaintances who traveled great distances to visit Morrie in the final months of his life.
(review taken from amazon.ca website)

This book was okay but not as fantastic as others had made it out to be. I have an interest characters with medical problems. I guess that's the nurse in me. I think I would have liked this book more if it was about ALS, and not all the things Morrie had learned in his life and was trying to teach Mitch...which I guess would defeat the whole purpose of the book. It was a short, easy read. Perfect to help get me back into the swing of reading regularily again.